Abernethy, Perth and Kinross – Wikipedia

Abernethy is believed to have been the seat of an early Pictish bishopric, its diocese extending westward along Strathearn. In the 12th century the bishop’s seat was moved to Muthill, then Dunblane, so that Abernethy, no longer being a residential bishopric is today listed by the Catholic Church as a titular see.[5]Abernethy remained the site of a small priory of Augustinian canons, founded 1272. In the 15th century, this priory was suppressed in favour of a collegiate church under the patronage of the Douglas Earls of Angus. Remains of the collegiate church survived until 1802 within the present village graveyard, when they were replaced by the present plain red sandstone church, which is still dedicated to Saint Brigid.[6]The village’s name is Celtic, meaning ‘confluence of the Nethy’ (i.e. with the River Tay), the earliest recorded form being Apurnethige. The Nethy Burn flows down from the Ochil Hills past the present village. Several pieces of Pictish or early medieval sculpture have been found in Abernethy, including an incomplete Pictish symbol stone attached to the base of the round tower. The location “Afarnach’s Hall” referred to in the earliest mediaeval Arthurian literature is usually identified as Abernethy.

Source: Abernethy, Perth and Kinross – Wikipedia

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